CENTRAL ASIA AND AZERBAIJAN AT AN ENERGY CROSSROADS

WEDNESDAY, 26TH NOVEMBER 2014
CENTRAL LONDON
13.00-18.00 FOLLOWED BY NETWORKING RECEPTION

Thank you for attending the 1st edition of the Geopolitics of Energy Series in London!

Over 70 experts gathered together in London to discuss the latest geopolitical developments in the region. Central Asia and Azerbaijan are attracting significant attention in the light of Russian and Chinese economic cooperation and Western activities in the region. This exclusive seminar provided first-hand analysis of this area’s evolving energy landscape. Participants were able to learn from leading experts and energy officials about issues and trends in the region and received key updates on recent projects, their attractiveness to investors and available financing options.

SPECIAL CONFERENCE FOCUS:

Hear from leading experts and energy officials of the changes within China-Russia-Kazakhstan energy relations. As a strong partner of Russia, a member of the CIS and several other integration processes in the Eurasian region, Kazakhstan is also actively developing economic relations with China. How do companies and the government manage business and state relations? What is the outlook? And what are potential future energy strategies?
How is the East-West balance in energy and economic relations changing in the Caspian region? What are the implications for future developments?
Understand the existing differences and their impact on companies
Russia has historically strong links within the post-soviet space. In recent years Central Asian energy companies have successfully diversified their oil and gas supply routes and attracted several major energy companies as key partners in projects. However, the Russian economic situation still has a considerable impact on the region.
Get updates on projects, their attractiveness to investors and available financing options.
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Who could you meet

The Caspian region’s share of global oil & gas exports is set to rise to 9 and 11 % respectively in the next 20 years: new major oil and gas export systems need to be developed to accommodate this potential.
Central Asian countries have adopted a dual approach: constructing new transit routes and attracting foreign upstream investments that go hand in hand with such pipeline projects.
Turkmenistan clearly wants to expand its export options by building the Trans Afghanistan Pakistan and India pipeline: it has already succeeded in moving away from dependence on the Russian market, and wants to ensure that it does not become dependent on the Chinese market.
Kazakhstan is seeking alternative routes for its crude exports in the event that US and EU sanctions affect its transit routes through Russia (the Atyrau Samara route is majority owned by Transneft).
The practices of projects’ financing were showcased by ING Bank and Vilson&Elkins using the example of the Surgil Project, an Uzbek-Korean joint venture in Uzbekistan, which sets the template and opens the door for future project finance deals in the resource-rich countries of Central Asia.

THE SURGIL PROJECT IS:

 UZBEKISTAN’S FIRST INTERNATIONAL OIL AND GAS PROJECT FINANCING
 CENTRAL ASIA’S LARGEST PROJECT FINANCING
 THE LARGEST PETROCHEMICAL PROJECT FINANCING IN THE FORMER SOVIET UNION
 THE LONGEST TENURE (16 YEARS) EVER ACHIEVED FOR A PETROCHEMICAL PROJECT FINANCING IN THE FORMER SOVIET UNION
 THE FIRST EQUATOR PRINCIPLES-COMPLIANT PROJECT IN UZBEKISTAN
 ONE OF THE LARGEST INTEGRATED UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM FINANCINGS

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